planting Blackeyed susans and daisies in clay

by julie
(ga)

Rudbeckia goldsturm

Rudbeckia goldsturm

Thinking of planting blackeyed susans (goldstrum) with shasta daisies. Will the daisies overgrow or be too big for this type of blackeyed susan? Also the article says they don't like clay. I am in Ga - all we have is clay, any suggestions? Area to be planted is day partial sun on a hill (good drainage). Any pointers would be appreciated.

Doug says that Shasta (regular big old fashioned varieties - not dwarves) will be fine with Rudbeckia 'Goldsturm'. Go easy on the number of Shasta as the white color will overpower the yellow very easily. Tough combination to match.

As for the clay - and Georgia. Fix the soil if you want long-term success. You can keep on planting them and hoping but until the soil is right - long term success is a problem. 'Goldsturm' is one of the best for clay soils however so you may find it works for you (always depending on how heavy that clay really is)

Here are some other clay loving perennials you might consider

Not overly worried about the part shade in this area - your summer heat / sun levels should hold the plant well enough. Up in the north, a part shade location is just not going to produce really good plants on either of these.




Comments for
planting Blackeyed susans and daisies in clay

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Clay and Black-Eyed Susans
by: Kamia

We have nothing but clay in Missouri too, but the native Black-Eyed Susans I have grow there anyway, so long as the soil is moist and they receive full sun. They are not long-lasting in that environment, however. The solve the problem, I've found that 3 applications of gypsum, timed one each fall, have lightened up the soil enough that I have a gorgeous meadow growing now. Make sure you are not growing a specific hybrid version of your plants, or they won't re-seed true

matching daisies with Goldstrum
by: Clara

I found some daisies bloom too early to show with black-eyed susan. "Becky"daisies bloom with Goldstrum. You might want to try white coneflowers.

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